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Prices & Coupons (Generic Mirena (52 MG))

1 box, 1 intrauterine device

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Mirena (52 MG)

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Pricing for Mirena (52 MG)

1 box, 1 intrauterine device Edit

Showing prices for Ashburn, VA

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Summary

FAQ

Consumer Forms: Device

Consumer Routes: Into the uterus

Therapeutic Classes: Contraceptive, Local, Endocrine-Metabolic Agent

About Mirena (52 MG)
SingleCare Discount Pricing
Savings
Uses
  • Prevents pregnancy and treats heavy menstrual bleeding. This is an intrauterine device (IUD), which is a reversible form of birth control. This IUD slowly releases levonorgestrel, a hormone.
  • This device is not right for everyone. Do not use it if you had an allergic reaction to levonorgestrel, or you are pregnant.
Directions
  • Your doctor will need to replace your IUD after 3 years for Liletta„¢ or Skyla„¢, or after 5 years for Kyleena„¢ or Mirena®. You will also need to have it replaced if it comes out of your uterus.
  • The IUD is usually inserted by your doctor during your monthly period. You will need to see your doctor 4 to 6 weeks after the IUD is placed and then once a year.
  • Your IUD has a string or "tail" that is made of plastic thread. About one or two inches of this string hangs into your vagina. You cannot see this string, and it will not cause problems when you have sex. Check your IUD after each monthly period. You may not be protected against pregnancy if you cannot feel the string or if you feel plastic. Do the following to check the placement of your IUD:Wash your hands with soap and warm water. Dry them with a clean towel.Bend your knees and squat low to the ground.Gently put your index finger high inside your vagina. The cervix is at the top of the vagina. Find the IUD string coming from your cervix. Never pull on the string. You should not be able to feel the plastic of the IUD itself. Wash your hands after you are done checking your IUD string.
Warnings
  • Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding, or you have had a baby, miscarriage, or abortion in the past 3 months. Tell your doctor if you have liver disease (including tumor or cancer), breast cancer, heart or blood circulation problems, including a history of heart valve problems, heart disease, blood clotting problems, stroke, heart attack, or high blood pressure. Tell your doctor if you have problems with your immune system or have had surgery on your female organs (especially fallopian tubes).
  • Tell your doctor if you have had any problems, infections, or other conditions that affected your reproductive system. There are many problems that could make an IUD a bad choice for you, including if you have fibroids, unexplained bleeding, a uterus that has an unusual shape, a recent infection, pelvic inflammatory disease, abnormal Pap test, ectopic pregnancy, cancer or suspected cancer, or an existing IUD.
  • There is a small chance that you could get pregnant when using an IUD, just as there is with any birth control. If you get pregnant, your doctor may remove your IUD to lower the risk of miscarriage or other problems.
  • This medicine may cause the following problems:Increased risk of ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy outside the uterus)Increased risk of a serious infection called pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)Increased risk for ovarian cystsPerforation (hole in the wall of your uterus), which can damage other organs
  • You might have some spotting and cramping during the first weeks after the IUD has been inserted. These symptoms should decrease or go away within a few weeks up to 6 months.
  • You could have less bleeding or even stop having periods by the end of the first year. Call your doctor if you have a change from the regular bleeding pattern after you have had your IUD for awhile, such as more bleeding or if you miss a period (and you were having periods even with your IUD).
  • An IUD can slip partly or all of the way out of your uterus. If this happens, use condoms or another form of birth control, and call your doctor right away.
  • This IUD will not protect you from HIV/AIDS, herpes, or other sexually transmitted diseases.
  • If you have the Skyla IUD„¢ or Kyleena IUD„¢, tell your healthcare provider before you have an MRI test.
Side effects
  • Yellow skin or eyes
  • Stomach or pelvic pain, tenderness, or cramping that is sudden or severe
  • Vaginal discharge has a bad smell, fever, chills, sores on your genitals
  • Allergic reaction: Itching or hives, swelling in your face or hands, swelling or tingling in your mouth or throat, chest tightness, trouble breathing
  • Chest pain, problems with speech or walking, numbness or weakness in your arm or leg or on one side of your body
  • Heavy bleeding from your vagina
  • Pain during sex, or if your partner feels the hard plastic of the IUD during sex
  • Severe headache, vision changes
  • Breast pain
  • Mild itching around your vagina and genitals
  • Change in bleeding pattern after the first few months
  • Acne or other skin changes
  • Dizziness or lightheadedness after IUD is placed
Avoid
  • You could have less bleeding or even stop having periods by the end of the first year. Call your doctor if you have a change from the regular bleeding pattern after you have had your IUD for awhile, such as more bleeding or if you miss a period (and you were having periods even with your IUD).
  • This medicine may cause the following problems:Increased risk of ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy outside the uterus)Increased risk of a serious infection called pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)Increased risk for ovarian cystsPerforation (hole in the wall of your uterus), which can damage other organs
  • You might have some spotting and cramping during the first weeks after the IUD has been inserted. These symptoms should decrease or go away within a few weeks up to 6 months.
  • There is a small chance that you could get pregnant when using an IUD, just as there is with any birth control. If you get pregnant, your doctor may remove your IUD to lower the risk of miscarriage or other problems.
  • If you have the Skyla IUD„¢, tell your healthcare provider before you have an MRI test.
  • Some medicines can affect how this device works. Tell your doctor if you are using a blood thinner (including warfarin).
  • An IUD can slip partly or all of the way out of your uterus. If this happens, use condoms or another form of birth control, and call your doctor right away.
  • This IUD will not protect you from HIV/AIDS, herpes, or other sexually transmitted diseases.

Mirena (52 MG) Discount Prices in Ashburn, VA

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Mirena (52 MG)


lee-voe-nor-JES-trel

Consumer Forms Device

Consumer Routes Into the uterus

Therapeutic Classes Contraceptive, Local, Endocrine-Metabolic Agent

Uses
  • Prevents pregnancy and treats heavy menstrual bleeding. This is an intrauterine device (IUD), which is a reversible form of birth control. This IUD slowly releases levonorgestrel, a hormone.
  • This device is not right for everyone. Do not use it if you had an allergic reaction to levonorgestrel, or you are pregnant.
Directions
  • Your doctor will need to replace your IUD after 3 years for Liletta„¢ or Skyla„¢, or after 5 years for Kyleena„¢ or Mirena®. You will also need to have it replaced if it comes out of your uterus.
  • The IUD is usually inserted by your doctor during your monthly period. You will need to see your doctor 4 to 6 weeks after the IUD is placed and then once a year.
  • Your IUD has a string or "tail" that is made of plastic thread. About one or two inches of this string hangs into your vagina. You cannot see this string, and it will not cause problems when you have sex. Check your IUD after each monthly period. You may not be protected against pregnancy if you cannot feel the string or if you feel plastic. Do the following to check the placement of your IUD:Wash your hands with soap and warm water. Dry them with a clean towel.Bend your knees and squat low to the ground.Gently put your index finger high inside your vagina. The cervix is at the top of the vagina. Find the IUD string coming from your cervix. Never pull on the string. You should not be able to feel the plastic of the IUD itself. Wash your hands after you are done checking your IUD string.
Warnings
  • Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding, or you have had a baby, miscarriage, or abortion in the past 3 months. Tell your doctor if you have liver disease (including tumor or cancer), breast cancer, heart or blood circulation problems, including a history of heart valve problems, heart disease, blood clotting problems, stroke, heart attack, or high blood pressure. Tell your doctor if you have problems with your immune system or have had surgery on your female organs (especially fallopian tubes).
  • Tell your doctor if you have had any problems, infections, or other conditions that affected your reproductive system. There are many problems that could make an IUD a bad choice for you, including if you have fibroids, unexplained bleeding, a uterus that has an unusual shape, a recent infection, pelvic inflammatory disease, abnormal Pap test, ectopic pregnancy, cancer or suspected cancer, or an existing IUD.
  • There is a small chance that you could get pregnant when using an IUD, just as there is with any birth control. If you get pregnant, your doctor may remove your IUD to lower the risk of miscarriage or other problems.
  • This medicine may cause the following problems:Increased risk of ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy outside the uterus)Increased risk of a serious infection called pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)Increased risk for ovarian cystsPerforation (hole in the wall of your uterus), which can damage other organs
  • You might have some spotting and cramping during the first weeks after the IUD has been inserted. These symptoms should decrease or go away within a few weeks up to 6 months.
  • You could have less bleeding or even stop having periods by the end of the first year. Call your doctor if you have a change from the regular bleeding pattern after you have had your IUD for awhile, such as more bleeding or if you miss a period (and you were having periods even with your IUD).
  • An IUD can slip partly or all of the way out of your uterus. If this happens, use condoms or another form of birth control, and call your doctor right away.
  • This IUD will not protect you from HIV/AIDS, herpes, or other sexually transmitted diseases.
  • If you have the Skyla IUD„¢ or Kyleena IUD„¢, tell your healthcare provider before you have an MRI test.
Side effects
  • Yellow skin or eyes
  • Stomach or pelvic pain, tenderness, or cramping that is sudden or severe
  • Vaginal discharge has a bad smell, fever, chills, sores on your genitals
  • Allergic reaction: Itching or hives, swelling in your face or hands, swelling or tingling in your mouth or throat, chest tightness, trouble breathing
  • Chest pain, problems with speech or walking, numbness or weakness in your arm or leg or on one side of your body
  • Heavy bleeding from your vagina
  • Pain during sex, or if your partner feels the hard plastic of the IUD during sex
  • Severe headache, vision changes
  • Breast pain
  • Mild itching around your vagina and genitals
  • Change in bleeding pattern after the first few months
  • Acne or other skin changes
  • Dizziness or lightheadedness after IUD is placed
Avoid
  • You could have less bleeding or even stop having periods by the end of the first year. Call your doctor if you have a change from the regular bleeding pattern after you have had your IUD for awhile, such as more bleeding or if you miss a period (and you were having periods even with your IUD).
  • This medicine may cause the following problems:Increased risk of ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy outside the uterus)Increased risk of a serious infection called pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)Increased risk for ovarian cystsPerforation (hole in the wall of your uterus), which can damage other organs
  • You might have some spotting and cramping during the first weeks after the IUD has been inserted. These symptoms should decrease or go away within a few weeks up to 6 months.
  • There is a small chance that you could get pregnant when using an IUD, just as there is with any birth control. If you get pregnant, your doctor may remove your IUD to lower the risk of miscarriage or other problems.
  • If you have the Skyla IUD„¢, tell your healthcare provider before you have an MRI test.
  • Some medicines can affect how this device works. Tell your doctor if you are using a blood thinner (including warfarin).
  • An IUD can slip partly or all of the way out of your uterus. If this happens, use condoms or another form of birth control, and call your doctor right away.
  • This IUD will not protect you from HIV/AIDS, herpes, or other sexually transmitted diseases.

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