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Toujeo vs Lantus: Main Differences and Similarities

Toujeo and Lantus are two long acting insulins indicated to treat high blood sugar in those with diabetes. Insulin is an essential hormone that is necessary to convert the sugars in your body into energy. People with diabetes may have higher sugar in their blood than normal which can cause further complications in the kidneys, blood vessels, and heart.

Both Toujeo and Lantus contain the same active ingredient, insulin glargine. However, they do have some differences which we will discuss further.

Toujeo

Toujeo was initially approved in the US in 2015. It is indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes. Toujeo is a slowly released insulin that takes up to 6 hours to produce glucose lowering effects. Effects from Toujeo can last up to 36 hours after administration. It takes up to 5 days to reach steady state and has a half-life of around 19 hours.

Toujeo is more concentrated compared to Lantus. It is available as a 300 units/mL injection in either a 1.5 mL or 3 mL SoloStar disposable prefilled pen. Toujeo is injected under the skin at the same time every day.

Lantus

Lantus was initially approved in 2000. Unlike Toujeo, Lantus is indicated to improve glycemic control in both adults and children with diabetes. Effects from Lantus can be felt up to 4 hours after administration and last up to 24 hours. Lantus also reaches steady state quicker than Toujeo at 2-4 days after the first dose.

Lantus is available as a 100 units/mL solution in a SoloStar prefilled pen like Toujeo. However, it also comes in 10 mL vials for use with a syringe. Lantus is typically dosed once daily at the same time every day.

Toujeo vs Lantus Side by Side Comparison

Toujeo and Lantus are two basal insulins that have several similarities and differences. These characteristics can be explored in the comparison table below.

Toujeo Lantus
Prescribed For
  • Type 1 diabetes mellitus
  • Type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Type 1 diabetes mellitus
  • Type 2 diabetes mellitus
Drug Classification
  • Long-acting insulin
  • Long-acting insulin
Manufacturer
Common Side Effects
  • Injection site reactions
  • Allergic reactions
  • Itching
  • Rash
  • Skin thickening or pits at injection site (lipodystrophy)
  • Weight gain
  • Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)
  • Swelling of hands and feet
  • Headache
  • Pharyngitis
  • Upper respiratory infection
  • Injection site reactions
  • Allergic reactions
  • Itching
  • Rash
  • Skin thickening or pits at injection site (lipodystrophy)
  • Weight gain
  • Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)
  • Swelling of hands and feet
  • Headache
  • Pharyngitis
  • Upper respiratory infection
Is there a generic?
  • No generic available
  • No generic available
Is it covered by insurance?
  • Varies according to your provider
  • Varies according to your provider
Dosage Forms
  • Subcutaneous solution
  • Subcutaneous solution
Average Cash Price
  • $432.18 per three 1.5 ml pens (300 units/ml)
  • $290 (perĀ 1, 10, 100 units/ml)
SingleCare Discount Price
Drug Interactions
  • Oral antidiabetic medications
  • Pramlintide acetate
  • Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors
  • Disopyramide
  • Fibrates
  • Fluoxetine
  • Monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors
  • Propoxyphene
  • Pentoxifylline
  • Salicylates
  • Somatostatin analogs
  • Sulfonamide antibiotics
  • Corticosteroids
  • Niacin
  • Danazol
  • Diuretics
  • Sympathomimetic agents (epinephrine, albuterol, terbutaline)
  • Glucagon
  • Isoniazid
  • Phenothiazine derivatives
  • Somatropin
  • Thyroid hormones
  • Oral contraceptives
  • Protease inhibitors
  • Olanzapine
  • Clozapine
  • Beta-blockers (metoprolol, nebivolol)
  • Clonidine
  • Lithium salts
  • Pentamidine
  • Guanethidine
  • Reserpine
  • Oral antidiabetic medications
  • Pramlintide acetate
  • Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors
  • Disopyramide
  • Fibrates
  • Fluoxetine
  • Monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors
  • Propoxyphene
  • Pentoxifylline
  • Salicylates
  • Somatostatin analogs
  • Sulfonamide antibiotics
  • Corticosteroids
  • Niacin
  • Danazol
  • Diuretics
  • Sympathomimetic agents (epinephrine, albuterol, terbutaline)
  • Glucagon
  • Isoniazid
  • Phenothiazine derivatives
  • Somatropin
  • Thyroid hormones
  • Oral contraceptives
  • Protease inhibitors
  • Olanzapine
  • Clozapine
  • Beta-blockers (metoprolol, nebivolol)
  • Clonidine
  • Lithium salts
  • Pentamidine
  • Guanethidine
  • Reserpine
Can I use while planning pregnancy, pregnant, or breastfeeding?
  • Toujeo is in Pregnancy Category B. It does not pose a risk for fetal harm. Consult a doctor regarding steps to take if planning pregnancy or breastfeeding.
  • Lantus is in Pregnancy Category B.It does not pose a risk for fetal harm. Consult a doctor regarding steps to take if planning pregnancy or breastfeeding.

Summary

Both Toujeo and Lantus are viable options to treat high blood sugar in diabetes. Both insulins are long acting which means they can be dosed once daily for consistent insulin release. Toujeo is more concentrated than Lantus and comes in two strengths of prefilled pen for easy administration. Lantus is available as a prefilled pen as well as a vial solution that can be administered with a syringe. It is also approved for use in some children whereas Toujeo is only approved for adults age 18 years and older.

Toujeo is more slowly released and is reported to have longer lasting effects compared to Lantus. However, both insulins carry a risk for hypoglycemia as with all other insulins. Therefore, it is important to monitor blood sugar consistently to prevent this adverse effect.

Overall, depending on condition and age, Toujeo or Lantus can be used to provide long acting insulin on a daily basis. While they are both administered the same and have similar side effects, it is important to discuss their differences with your doctor. Use this information as a comparison to determine which insulin may be best for you.