80% Off Invega Coupons & Discounts You Can Use in 2017

Invega Prices & Coupons (Paliperidone ER)

30 tablet extended release 24 hour, 6mg

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Invega is a medication that treats schizophrenia (a mental disorder that is characterized by hallucinations, inappropriate emotions, mood disorders, or loss of interest in life). Paliperidone ER is the generic version of Invega. The Invega cost is quite expensive and averages $1,070 for a supply of 30 extended-release 24-hour tablets. Using our free SingleCare coupon, you can lower this cost by as much as 80% when you bring your discount savings card with you when you pick up your medication.

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Paliperidone ER

Invega is a medication that treats schizophrenia (a mental disorder that is characterized by hallucinations, inappropriate emotions, mood disorders, or loss of interest in life). Paliperidone ER is the generic version of Invega. The Invega cost is quite expensive and averages $1,070 for a supply of 30 extended-release 24-hour tablets. Using our free SingleCare coupon, you can lower this cost by as much as 80% when you bring your discount savings card with you when you pick up your medication.

Read more

Pricing for Paliperidone ER

30 tablet extended release 24 hour, 6mg Edit

Showing prices for San Francisco, CA

Discounts

Summary

FAQ

Consumer Forms: Long Acting Tablet

Consumer Routes: By mouth

Therapeutic Classes: Antipsychotic

About Paliperidone ER
SingleCare Discount Pricing
Savings
Uses
  • Treats schizophrenia (a mental disorder). Used alone or together with other medicines to treat patients with schizoaffective disorder.
  • You should not use this medicine if you have had an allergic reaction to paliperidone or risperidone.
Directions
  • Take your medicine as directed. Your dose may need to be changed several times to find what works best for you.
  • Oral routeYou may take this medicine with or without food.
  • Swallow the extended-release tablet whole. Do not crush, break, or chew it. Swallow the tablet with a liquid, such as water or juice.
  • If you take the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stools. This is normal and is nothing to worry about.
Warnings
  • This medicine may cause an increase in your blood sugar. If you or your child have diabetes, you may need to check your blood sugar more often. If you are using a medicine for diabetes, your doctor may need to change your dose.
  • This medicine is not approved to treat behavior disorders in older people who have dementia. Using this medicine to treat this problem could increase the risk of death. This risk has not been shown for the approved uses of this medicine.
  • Some side effects are more likely to happen in elderly people who have memory problems or other reduced mental skills. Make sure the doctor knows if the person who will be using this medicine has forgetfulness or confusion related to aging (such as Alzheimer's disease or dementia).
  • Stop taking this medicine and check with your doctor right away if you or your child have any of the following symptoms while using this medicine: convulsions (seizures), difficulty with breathing, a fast heartbeat, a high fever, high or low blood pressure, increased sweating, loss of bladder control, severe muscle stiffness, unusually pale skin, or tiredness. These could be symptoms of a serious condition called neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS).
  • Tardive dyskinesia (a movement disorder) may occur and may not go away after you stop using this medicine. Check with your doctor right away if you or your child have any of the following symptoms while taking this medicine: lip smacking or puckering, puffing of the cheeks, rapid or worm-like movements of the tongue, uncontrolled chewing movements, or uncontrolled movements of the arms and legs.
  • This medicine may make you dizzy, lightheaded, or drowsy. Avoid driving, using machines, or doing anything else that could be dangerous if you are not alert. Change positions slowly when getting up from a sitting or lying position.
  • This medicine may cause some people to be agitated, irritable, or display other abnormal behaviors. It may also cause some people to have suicidal thoughts and tendencies or to become more depressed. If you, your child, or your caregiver notice any of these side effects, tell your doctor right away.
  • This medicine might reduce how much you sweat. Your body could get too hot if you do not sweat enough. If your body gets too hot, you might feel dizzy, weak, tired, or confused. You might vomit or have an upset stomach. Do not get too hot while you are exercising. Avoid places that are very hot. Call your doctor if you or your child are too hot and cannot cool down.
  • This medicine may make you bleed, bruise, or get infections more easily. Take precautions to prevent illness and injury. Wash your hands often.
  • Your doctor will check your progress and the effects of this medicine at regular visits. Keep all appointments. Blood tests may be needed to check for any unwanted effects.
  • This medicine may increase your weight. Your doctor may need to check your or your child's weight regularly during treatment with this medicine.
  • Swelling of the breasts or unusual milk production.
  • Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse.
  • Trouble with speaking or swallowing.
  • Unusual bleeding, bruising, or weakness.
  • Twitching or muscle movements you cannot control (often in your face, tongue, or jaw).
  • Make sure your doctor knows if you are pregnant or breastfeeding, or if you have kidney disease, liver disease, diabetes, breast cancer, brain tumor, high cholesterol in the blood, stomach or bowel blockage, Reye's syndrome, Parkinson's disease, trouble with swallowing, or a history of seizures or neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS). Tell your doctor if you have any kind of blood vessel or heart problems, including low blood pressure, heart failure, a low amount of blood, heart rhythm problems (such as QT prolongation), or a history of a heart attack or stroke. Also tell your doctor if you have ever had thoughts of hurting yourself.
Side effects
  • Change in how much or how often you urinate.
  • Chills, cough, sore throat, and body aches.
  • Dry mouth, increased thirst, muscle cramps, nausea, or vomiting.
  • Fast, slow, pounding, or uneven heartbeat.
  • Lightheadedness, dizziness, or fainting.
  • Fever, confusion, sweating, or muscle stiffness.
  • Allergic reaction: Itching or hives, swelling in your face or hands, swelling or tingling in your mouth or throat, chest tightness, trouble breathing
  • Problems with balance or walking.
  • Trouble with speaking or swallowing.
  • Painful, prolonged erection of your penis (in males).
  • Seizures or tremors.
  • Mood or behavioral changes, or thoughts of hurting yourself or others.
  • Swelling of the breasts or unusual milk production.
  • Unusual bleeding, bruising, or weakness.
  • Pinpoint red spots on your skin.
  • Twitching or muscle movements you cannot control (often in your face, tongue, or jaw).
  • Neck muscle spasm, throat tightness, difficulty with swallowing or breathing, or sticking out of the tongue.
  • Sleepiness or unusual drowsiness.
  • Weight gain.
  • Stomach pain or upset stomach.
  • Anxiety or restlessness.
  • Headache.
  • Drooling.
  • Unusual tiredness or weakness.
Avoid
  • Make sure your doctor knows if you are using medicines for heart rhythm problems (such as amiodarone, procainamide, quinidine, sotalol, Betapace®, Cordarone®, or Procanbid®) or a diuretic or a "water pill" (such as furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide [HCTZ], Aldactazide®, Aldactone®, Lasix®, or Maxzide®).
  • Tell your doctor if you are using carbamazepine (Tegretol®), divalproex sodium (Depakote®), levodopa (Dopar®, Larodopa®), any medicine for mental illness (such as chlorpromazine, thioridazine, Mellaril®, or Thorazine®), or certain antibiotic medicines (such as gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, Avelox®, or Tequin®).
  • This medicine may make you dizzy, lightheaded, or drowsy. Avoid driving, using machines, or doing anything else that could be dangerous if you are not alert. Change positions slowly when getting up from a sitting or lying position.
  • This medicine may make you bleed, bruise, or get infections more easily. Take precautions to prevent illness and injury. Wash your hands often.
  • This medicine may cause some people to be agitated, irritable, or display other abnormal behaviors. It may also cause some people to have suicidal thoughts and tendencies or to become more depressed. If you, your child, or your caregiver notice any of these side effects, tell your doctor right away.
  • Tardive dyskinesia (a movement disorder) may occur and may not go away after you stop using this medicine. Check with your doctor right away if you or your child have any of the following symptoms while taking this medicine: lip smacking or puckering, puffing of the cheeks, rapid or worm-like movements of the tongue, uncontrolled chewing movements, or uncontrolled movements of the arms and legs.
  • Do not drink alcohol while you are using this medicine.
  • Tell your doctor if you use anything else that makes you sleepy. Some examples are allergy medicine, narcotic pain medicine, and alcohol.
  • Stop taking this medicine and check with your doctor right away if you or your child have any of the following symptoms while using this medicine: convulsions (seizures), difficulty with breathing, a fast heartbeat, a high fever, high or low blood pressure, increased sweating, loss of bladder control, severe muscle stiffness, unusually pale skin, or tiredness. These could be symptoms of a serious condition called neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS).
  • This medicine might reduce how much you sweat. Your body could get too hot if you do not sweat enough. If your body gets too hot, you might feel dizzy, weak, tired, or confused. You might vomit or have an upset stomach. Do not get too hot while you are exercising. Avoid places that are very hot. Call your doctor if you or your child are too hot and cannot cool down.
  • This medicine may increase your weight. Your doctor may need to check your or your child's weight regularly during treatment with this medicine.
  • Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse.
  • Your doctor will check your progress and the effects of this medicine at regular visits. Keep all appointments. Blood tests may be needed to check for any unwanted effects.

Paliperidone ER Discount Prices in San Francisco, CA

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How to get the most from your Invega (paliperidone er) coupon

What is Invega and what does it do?

Invega extended-release tablets treat schizophrenia in adults and teenagers. Invega is a type of medication called antipsychotics because it affects the chemicals in the brain. Invega can help decrease mood disorders and hallucinations while improving the patient’s mental well-being.

Which drugs are similar to Invega ?

While there are other drugs available on the market that also work to treat schizophrenia, there are not currently any drugs similar to Invega available in the U.S. In fact, Invega is the only FDA approved oral medication for schizophrenia.

What is the price of Invega without insurance?

The average Invega cost depends on several things: your insurance coverage, your daily dosage, and the pharmacy where you shop. The Invega cost is quite expensive and averages $1,070 for a monthly supply of 30 extended-release 24-hour tablets.

Is there a generic version of Invega?

Paliperidone ER is the generic version of Invega. You can also use our free coupon card for savings on the generic version.

What dosages are available for Invega ?

Invega extended-release tablets are available in strengths of 1.5 mg, 3 mg, 6 mg, and 9 mg. While the recommended dosage is once-daily, follow your doctor's instructions for dosage and use of this medication.

How else can I save on Invega ?

There are several ways to save on the Invega cost. Through the Johnson & Johnson Patient Assistance Foundation uninsured patients can receive their prescriptions for free. Contact this program directly for more information. You can also use our free coupon. Our customers typically find that they save more by using our SingleCare savings card.

Free savings up to 80% off the cost of your prescriptions

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Invega (paliperidone er)


pal-ee-PER-i-done

Consumer Forms Long Acting Tablet

Consumer Routes By mouth

Therapeutic Classes Antipsychotic

Uses
  • Treats schizophrenia (a mental disorder). Used alone or together with other medicines to treat patients with schizoaffective disorder.
  • You should not use this medicine if you have had an allergic reaction to paliperidone or risperidone.
Directions
  • Take your medicine as directed. Your dose may need to be changed several times to find what works best for you.
  • Oral routeYou may take this medicine with or without food.
  • Swallow the extended-release tablet whole. Do not crush, break, or chew it. Swallow the tablet with a liquid, such as water or juice.
  • If you take the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stools. This is normal and is nothing to worry about.
Warnings
  • This medicine may cause an increase in your blood sugar. If you or your child have diabetes, you may need to check your blood sugar more often. If you are using a medicine for diabetes, your doctor may need to change your dose.
  • This medicine is not approved to treat behavior disorders in older people who have dementia. Using this medicine to treat this problem could increase the risk of death. This risk has not been shown for the approved uses of this medicine.
  • Some side effects are more likely to happen in elderly people who have memory problems or other reduced mental skills. Make sure the doctor knows if the person who will be using this medicine has forgetfulness or confusion related to aging (such as Alzheimer's disease or dementia).
  • Stop taking this medicine and check with your doctor right away if you or your child have any of the following symptoms while using this medicine: convulsions (seizures), difficulty with breathing, a fast heartbeat, a high fever, high or low blood pressure, increased sweating, loss of bladder control, severe muscle stiffness, unusually pale skin, or tiredness. These could be symptoms of a serious condition called neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS).
  • Tardive dyskinesia (a movement disorder) may occur and may not go away after you stop using this medicine. Check with your doctor right away if you or your child have any of the following symptoms while taking this medicine: lip smacking or puckering, puffing of the cheeks, rapid or worm-like movements of the tongue, uncontrolled chewing movements, or uncontrolled movements of the arms and legs.
  • This medicine may make you dizzy, lightheaded, or drowsy. Avoid driving, using machines, or doing anything else that could be dangerous if you are not alert. Change positions slowly when getting up from a sitting or lying position.
  • This medicine may cause some people to be agitated, irritable, or display other abnormal behaviors. It may also cause some people to have suicidal thoughts and tendencies or to become more depressed. If you, your child, or your caregiver notice any of these side effects, tell your doctor right away.
  • This medicine might reduce how much you sweat. Your body could get too hot if you do not sweat enough. If your body gets too hot, you might feel dizzy, weak, tired, or confused. You might vomit or have an upset stomach. Do not get too hot while you are exercising. Avoid places that are very hot. Call your doctor if you or your child are too hot and cannot cool down.
  • This medicine may make you bleed, bruise, or get infections more easily. Take precautions to prevent illness and injury. Wash your hands often.
  • Your doctor will check your progress and the effects of this medicine at regular visits. Keep all appointments. Blood tests may be needed to check for any unwanted effects.
  • This medicine may increase your weight. Your doctor may need to check your or your child's weight regularly during treatment with this medicine.
  • Swelling of the breasts or unusual milk production.
  • Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse.
  • Trouble with speaking or swallowing.
  • Unusual bleeding, bruising, or weakness.
  • Twitching or muscle movements you cannot control (often in your face, tongue, or jaw).
  • Make sure your doctor knows if you are pregnant or breastfeeding, or if you have kidney disease, liver disease, diabetes, breast cancer, brain tumor, high cholesterol in the blood, stomach or bowel blockage, Reye's syndrome, Parkinson's disease, trouble with swallowing, or a history of seizures or neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS). Tell your doctor if you have any kind of blood vessel or heart problems, including low blood pressure, heart failure, a low amount of blood, heart rhythm problems (such as QT prolongation), or a history of a heart attack or stroke. Also tell your doctor if you have ever had thoughts of hurting yourself.
Side effects
  • Change in how much or how often you urinate.
  • Chills, cough, sore throat, and body aches.
  • Dry mouth, increased thirst, muscle cramps, nausea, or vomiting.
  • Fast, slow, pounding, or uneven heartbeat.
  • Lightheadedness, dizziness, or fainting.
  • Fever, confusion, sweating, or muscle stiffness.
  • Allergic reaction: Itching or hives, swelling in your face or hands, swelling or tingling in your mouth or throat, chest tightness, trouble breathing
  • Problems with balance or walking.
  • Trouble with speaking or swallowing.
  • Painful, prolonged erection of your penis (in males).
  • Seizures or tremors.
  • Mood or behavioral changes, or thoughts of hurting yourself or others.
  • Swelling of the breasts or unusual milk production.
  • Unusual bleeding, bruising, or weakness.
  • Pinpoint red spots on your skin.
  • Twitching or muscle movements you cannot control (often in your face, tongue, or jaw).
  • Neck muscle spasm, throat tightness, difficulty with swallowing or breathing, or sticking out of the tongue.
  • Sleepiness or unusual drowsiness.
  • Weight gain.
  • Stomach pain or upset stomach.
  • Anxiety or restlessness.
  • Headache.
  • Drooling.
  • Unusual tiredness or weakness.
Avoid
  • Make sure your doctor knows if you are using medicines for heart rhythm problems (such as amiodarone, procainamide, quinidine, sotalol, Betapace®, Cordarone®, or Procanbid®) or a diuretic or a "water pill" (such as furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide [HCTZ], Aldactazide®, Aldactone®, Lasix®, or Maxzide®).
  • Tell your doctor if you are using carbamazepine (Tegretol®), divalproex sodium (Depakote®), levodopa (Dopar®, Larodopa®), any medicine for mental illness (such as chlorpromazine, thioridazine, Mellaril®, or Thorazine®), or certain antibiotic medicines (such as gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, Avelox®, or Tequin®).
  • This medicine may make you dizzy, lightheaded, or drowsy. Avoid driving, using machines, or doing anything else that could be dangerous if you are not alert. Change positions slowly when getting up from a sitting or lying position.
  • This medicine may make you bleed, bruise, or get infections more easily. Take precautions to prevent illness and injury. Wash your hands often.
  • This medicine may cause some people to be agitated, irritable, or display other abnormal behaviors. It may also cause some people to have suicidal thoughts and tendencies or to become more depressed. If you, your child, or your caregiver notice any of these side effects, tell your doctor right away.
  • Tardive dyskinesia (a movement disorder) may occur and may not go away after you stop using this medicine. Check with your doctor right away if you or your child have any of the following symptoms while taking this medicine: lip smacking or puckering, puffing of the cheeks, rapid or worm-like movements of the tongue, uncontrolled chewing movements, or uncontrolled movements of the arms and legs.
  • Do not drink alcohol while you are using this medicine.
  • Tell your doctor if you use anything else that makes you sleepy. Some examples are allergy medicine, narcotic pain medicine, and alcohol.
  • Stop taking this medicine and check with your doctor right away if you or your child have any of the following symptoms while using this medicine: convulsions (seizures), difficulty with breathing, a fast heartbeat, a high fever, high or low blood pressure, increased sweating, loss of bladder control, severe muscle stiffness, unusually pale skin, or tiredness. These could be symptoms of a serious condition called neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS).
  • This medicine might reduce how much you sweat. Your body could get too hot if you do not sweat enough. If your body gets too hot, you might feel dizzy, weak, tired, or confused. You might vomit or have an upset stomach. Do not get too hot while you are exercising. Avoid places that are very hot. Call your doctor if you or your child are too hot and cannot cool down.
  • This medicine may increase your weight. Your doctor may need to check your or your child's weight regularly during treatment with this medicine.
  • Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse.
  • Your doctor will check your progress and the effects of this medicine at regular visits. Keep all appointments. Blood tests may be needed to check for any unwanted effects.

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