Copaxone Coupon 2018: Up to 80% Discount

Copaxone Coupons & Prices

coupons & prices 1 syringe , 1ml of 20mg/ml

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Controlled Substance

Glatopa is used to treat multiple sclerosis (MS) and to prevent relapse of MS. There is currently no generic version of Glatopa available in the United States. On average, a supply of 30 ml, 20 mg/mL Glatopa subcutaneous solution cost about $4,553. Get savings of up to 80% when you use our free prescription coupon card at any participating pharmacy near you. Read more

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Use your SingleCare CVS card or get a coupon for this price.
$5 off only applies on first prescription filled.

Use your SingleCare Walmart card or get a coupon for this price.
$5 off only applies on first prescription filled.

Free savings up to 80%* off the cost of your prescriptions

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How to get the most from your Copaxone coupon

What is Copaxone and what does it do?

Copaxone is a daily subcutaneous injection that reduces symptom episodes in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. MS is a nerve disease that causes numbness, weakness, loss of coordination, problems with speech, and loss of bladder control. Relapsing-remitting MS is a type of the disease in which the symptoms occur only from time to time.

Which drugs are similar to Copaxone ?

There are no similar drugs to Copaxone, though there are other medications that treat the same condition. Talk to your physician to determine the medications best suited to treat your condition.

What is the price of Copaxone without insurance?

Without insurance, Copaxone costs between about $7,435 and $6,096 depending on dosage, quantity needed and pharmacy location.

Is there a generic version of Copaxone ?

The generic version of Copaxone is called glatiramer injection, but it is not currently available on the US market.

What dosages are available for Copaxone ?

Copaxone is a subcutaneous injection available as a 30 mL, 20 mg/mL solution and as a 12 mL, 40 mg/mL solution. Take Copaxone only as it is prescribed to you by your physician.

How else can I save on Copaxone ?

Qualified applicants may receive help paying for their medications through the Patient Access Network Foundation. Commercially-insured patients are also eligible for the Copaxone Co-pay Solutions program. Compare these prescription discount options with our Copaxone coupons, SingleCare patients often find they are able to save more.

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Robert W.

My husband was between jobs and we had no insurance. Walmart employees told us about SingleCare and it saved us 220.00. I am not kidding! We were floored and so happy. I tell everyone about SingleCare.

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Compared to GoodRx, SingleCare is a lot cheaper. My husband and I lost our insurance after 33 years of coverage. Thank you!

Sarah P.

Copaxone


gla-TIR-a-mer

Consumer Forms Injectable

Consumer Routes By injection

Therapeutic Classes Central Nervous System Agent, Immune Suppressant, Musculoskeletal Agent

Glatopa is a combination of four amino acids that work by preventing your immune system from attacking the nerves in your brain and spinal cord. It is used to treat multiple sclerosis (MS) and to prevent relapse of MS.

Uses
  • Reduces the frequency of flare-ups (relapses) in patients who have relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RMMS).
  • You should not use this medicine if you have had an allergic reaction to glatiramer or mannitol.
Directions
  • Injection routeYour doctor will prescribe your exact dose and tell you how often it should be given. This medicine is given as a shot under your skin.
  • Injection routeYou may be taught how to give your medicine at home. Make sure you understand all instructions before giving yourself an injection. Do not use more medicine or use it more often than your doctor tells you to.
  • Injection routeYou will be shown the body areas where this shot can be given. Use a different body area each time you give yourself a shot. Keep track of where you give each shot to make sure you rotate body areas.
  • Injection routeUse a new needle and syringe each time you inject your medicine.
  • Read and follow the patient instructions that come with this medicine. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.
Warnings
  • Warmth or redness in your face, neck, arms, or upper chest.
  • Unusual bleeding, bruising, or weakness.
  • Trouble with swallowing.
  • Swelling in your face, hands, ankles, or feet.
  • Sores or ulcers in the mouth or lips.
  • Your doctor will check your progress and the effects of this medicine at regular visits. Keep all appointments.
  • Swollen, painful, or tender lymph glands in the neck, armpit, or groin.
  • Do not stop using this medicine without first checking with your doctor.
  • Avoid people who are sick or have infections.
  • This medicine may cause a permanent depression under the skin at the injection site. Contact your doctor right away if you notice any of these side effects at the injection site: depressed or indented skin; blue-green to black skin discoloration; or pain, redness, or sloughing (peeling) of the skin.
  • Some patients may have a reaction a few minutes after receiving a shot. This reaction may include flushing, a fast or pounding heartbeat, chest pain, shortness of breath, anxiety, a tight feeling in the throat, or hives. The reaction usually lasts a few minutes and goes away without treatment. If the reaction gets severe or does not go away, call your doctor right away. This reaction can happen even if you have used the medicine regularly for several months. Also, chest pain can occur by itself, but should not last more than a few minutes.
  • Make sure your doctor knows if you are pregnant or breastfeeding, or if you have an infection.
Side effects
  • Trouble with swallowing.
  • Unusual bleeding, bruising, or weakness.
  • Warmth or redness in your face, neck, arms, or upper chest.
  • Swollen, painful, or tender lymph glands in the neck, armpit, or groin.
  • Swelling in your face, hands, ankles, or feet.
  • Sores or ulcers in the mouth or lips.
  • Severe pain, redness, swelling, itching, or lump where the shot is given.
  • Fever, chills, cough, sore throat, and body aches.
  • Fast, pounding, or uneven heartbeat.
  • Chest pain, shortness of breath, or trouble with breathing.
  • Anxiety.
  • Allergic reaction: Itching or hives, swelling in your face or hands, swelling or tingling in your mouth or throat, chest tightness, trouble breathing
  • Discoloration of the skin.
  • Mild pain, redness, swelling, itching, or lump where the shot is given.
  • Stuffy or runny nose.
  • Double vision or changes in vision.
  • Nausea or vomiting.
  • Sweating.
  • Back pain.
  • Rash or itching.
  • Joint or muscle pain.
Avoid
  • Your doctor will check your progress and the effects of this medicine at regular visits. Keep all appointments.
  • Do not stop using this medicine without first checking with your doctor.
  • Avoid people who are sick or have infections.
  • This medicine may cause a permanent depression under the skin at the injection site. Contact your doctor right away if you notice any of these side effects at the injection site: depressed or indented skin; blue-green to black skin discoloration; or pain, redness, or sloughing (peeling) of the skin.
  • Some patients may have a reaction a few minutes after receiving a shot. This reaction may include flushing, a fast or pounding heartbeat, chest pain, shortness of breath, anxiety, a tight feeling in the throat, or hives. The reaction usually lasts a few minutes and goes away without treatment. If the reaction gets severe or does not go away, call your doctor right away. This reaction can happen even if you have used the medicine regularly for several months. Also, chest pain can occur by itself, but should not last more than a few minutes.
  • Make sure your doctor knows if you are pregnant or breastfeeding, or if you have an infection.

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